Connecting Lake Simcoe's Community

Marj Mossman and Barb Love grew up spending summer at Lake Simcoe, and now have retired with their husbands to Lake Simcoe's shores. Their passion for the lake drove them to start Heritage Lake Simcoe, to achieve the designation for Lake Simcoe as Canada's first Heritage Lake - and "give Lake Simcoe the respect it deserves."

Historic "Emily May" replica unveiled at Innisfil Town Hall

Historic "Emily May" replica unveiled at Innisfil Town Hall

On Jan. 6, 2015, the Innisfil Historical Society unveiled the "Emily May" a replica of the paddlewheeler that plied Lake Simcoe in the late 1800s. The unveiling took place in the lobby of the Innisfil Town Hall where the boat will be permanently on display.

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Olympic Party on Lake Simcoe

 On Sunday, Feb. 9 at 2 p.m., an Olympic Party took place on Lake Simcoe.

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Tell your Lake Simcoe story!

When I was growing up and spending every summer at our family cottage on Lake Simcoe, I spent a lot of time in Innisfil Park.

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Share your story about growing up on Lake Simcoe

When I was growing up, summers at our cottage on Lake Simcoe were special.

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Summers on Lake Simcoe

Summers on Lake Simcoe

Growing up, I spent my summer holidays at our cottage on Lake Simcoe.When my Father was a bachelor, he purchased a bright red, canvass covered, cedar strip, Peterborough canoe with sponsons, or pressurized air pockets, down the sides. It and his 1927 Hupmobile were his pride and joy. He kept his car in top shape and his canoe in ship shape. Then he married my Mother. They had two daughters and all things changed. He had to share his beloved canoe with a family. When we went out for a ride, it was a special time. The lake would have to be as smooth as glass. He would announce at supper that we would paddle to Tent City for ice cream cones. Big Cedar Point was directly across the water from us and Tent City was around the Point.It was quite a ritual to get the canoe ready. Actually, when I was a teenager it was downright embarrassing, but I digress. First the canoe was wheeled down to the dock and tipped in.Then rugs, pillows, back rests and paddles were placed inside. My Grandmother was next, then my Aunt, my Mom, we four kids, the dog and finally my Dad shoved off. Everybody knew their spot and everybody knew the boat rules. My Father was very strict about his canoe. We kids were never  allowed to take it out on our own. In spite of all this, we loved going for a paddle. My seat was on a pillow at the very front, in the bow. It was fun to drag my hand in the water, hold up my arm, and my nails looked very long. We kids had our own paddles and we paddled carefully when asked, remembering never to scrape the edge of the canoe. My Dad had taught us all how to paddle, dip and pull, quietly like the First Nations people who lived on the islands. There were very few boats on the lake back then, other canoes, sailboats and some small motorboats. In our bay, a doctor owned a spiffy launch. When he took it out the whole bay knew. We heard the growl of the motor and we’d rush to watch it go by. We’d wave and wish we could go out for a ride but we were never invited. In our canoe, we would arrive back at the cottage about dusk, just in time to put everything away, then go inside and light the lamps. As a kid, to see the sun set across the water and the moon rise over the baywas truly a delight.Remembering times like these gives me great pleasure. I was a very fortunate little girl.Do you have special memories of times at your cottage? Please feel free to send them to me and I will post them on the blog. My email is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.    Until next time, Marj

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Why should Lake Simcoe be Canada's first Heritage Lake?

I was explaining to someone at an event in Innisfil why Lake Simcoe deserves to be designated as the first Heritage Lake in Canada. Our First Nations People used it as a trade route.  The Carrying Place Trail has been marked from Toronto to Holland Landing. The Trail follows the Humber River with many portages along the way. The natives fished and lived along the shores of the Lake. They farmed the wild rice and their “three sisters” squash, corn and beans.

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Mary Jane Brinkos
I couldn't agree more! The lake is a very important aspect of why I now live here after cottaging on the shores of Lake Simcoe my ... Read More
Monday, 14 October 2013 10:12
Laurie Wallace
Champlain, Governor Simcoe, and Franklin paddled past my cottage shore. They saw what I see each day--an extraordinary expanse of... Read More
Monday, 04 November 2013 22:23
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Heritage Lake Simcoe Blog #19

It is the end of June and the waters of Lake Simcoe are high. We had a very rough day about two weeks ago. There were white caps rolling over our dock and many folks lost their docks or pieces of them, plus chairs and other odds and sods went floating down the bay. Boats left their moorings and ended up on the rocks. I have never seen the lake that wild and I have been here all my life.

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Moderator
Weather and water conditions vary so much on Lake Simcoe! Marj was talking about conditions at Innisfil, just south of Innisfil Be... Read More
Tuesday, 10 September 2013 13:01
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Innisfil's first Doors Open

Well the ice eventually went out on Monday, April 22. It just kept sinking beneath the surface until it disappeared. Every year, the ice going out is different. The water is very high at present and we haven’t had a big storm yet.

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When will the ice go out?

It is Monday, April 8, 2013. The sky is overcast & it is starting to rain. There’s a slight breeze and Lake Simcoe is looking very dark grey in colour, with big watery puddles and cracks in the ice everywhere. Everyone is betting on when the ice will go out.

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Collecting stories - Blog #16

Heritage Lake Simcoe is busy collecting stories about the lake & watershed. Everyone has a story & we have been listening & recording with Kathryn Schoutson of the Innisfil Library.

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