Connecting Lake Simcoe's Community

Georgian College Orillia Campus is hosting two events to bring awareness to missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Every Indigenous woman and girl should feel safe wherever they live in Canada, the college says. The Aboriginal Centre at Georgian College’s Orillia Campus is hosting two events to bring awareness to the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women.

On Monday, Nov. 30 Regional Grand Chief Isadore Day, of the Chiefs of Ontario Office, will speak about the “Who is She” campaign. The goal of the campaign is to find the root causes, provide recommendations, and create tangible solutions to end violence against Indigenous women and girls in Aboriginal communities and on the streets of Canadian towns and cities. The campaign will also allow people to honour the lives of the women and girls who have gone missing or have been murdered. 

Chief Day will facilitate a discussion to develop a concrete plan to stem the tide and prevent more women from disappearing. The presentation and discussion will take place in the theatre from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by a meet and greet in the Aboriginal Resource Centre. For more information about the campaign, visit www.whoisshe.ca.  

“Prior to the new Liberal government, a national inquiry into the missing or murdered Aboriginal women was not seen as a need,” says Dawn Ireland-Noganosh, Aboriginal Services.

“The stark reality of those missing and murdered women is that they do possess a name and are significant to our families, communities, culture and our ceremonies.  A national inquiry needs to be a collaboration with the families of these women, and needs to be directed by them, not for them. Through Georgian’s Aboriginal Resource Center and this meeting of the minds with Chief Day, hopefully we can help shape this inquiry.”

The second event is on Friday, Dec. 4. Georgian will host a screening of the film Highway of Tears in the theatre at 1 p.m.  The film, directed by Matt Smiley, is about missing or murdered women along a 724-kilometre stretch of highway in northern British Columbia. The film will be introduced by Gladys Radek. Radek is a co-founder of Walk4Justice, a series of walks that bring awareness to the issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women.

The screening will be followed by an introduction to the REDress Project created by Jaime Black. REDress focuses on the issue of missing or murdered Aboriginal women across Canada and is an installation art project based on an aesthetic response to the issue.  For more information on the project visit, www.redressproject.org

“As an advocate for Aboriginal women, it is my hope, via the Aboriginal Resource Centre, to create awareness, education and prevention with the tools that have been created and developed within our school community as well as reaching out to other resources, such as this film,” says Ireland-Noganosh.

Donations to the “Who is She” campaign and Tears4Justice would be appreciated.

Photo: Regional Grand Chief Isadore Day, of the Chiefs of Ontario Office, will speak about the “Who is She” campaign at the Orillia Campus on Nov. 30. Article and photo courtesy of Georgian College

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