Connecting Lake Simcoe's Community

Ontario has developed a plan to combat invasive species in order to protect the province’s environment and its economy.
The Ontario Invasive Species Strategic Plan outlines Ontario’s approach to the prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invasive species and the effective management of such existing invasive species as round goby, zebra mussels and the emerald ash borer. Several ministries will work together under the plan to ensure threats to the province’s biodiversity and its economy are dealt with as effectively as possible.
The government has also committed to renew its partnership with the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters to promote greater public awareness of invasive species through education and outreach — a major goal in the plan.
Protecting Ontario against invasive species is part of the McGuinty government’s plan to ensure a healthy environment and a strong economy. A strong economy protects the services that mean most to Ontario families — health care and education.
“The plan serves as an excellent framework for all of us in the invasive species network to focus on priorities and work collaboratively in response to the serious ecological and socio-economic threats that invasive species represent," says Robert Lambe, executive director of the Invasive Species Centre. "The centre is eager to work with the Ontario government and our broad network of partners and stakeholders to deliver on key priorities.”

QUICK FACTS

• Invasive species are species that come from other countries or regions and threaten the environment, economy or society by disrupting local ecosystems. They are the second greatest threat to Ontario’s biodiversity after habitat loss.

• Zebra mussels cost the province between $75-million and $91-million per year due to economic losses in recreational and commercial fishing and boating, damages to infrastructure, and other complications resulting from the associated algae growth.

• Since 2010, enforcement officers have seized almost 39,000 lbs. of Asian carp that were destined for Ontario markets.

• Garlic mustard was brought over from Europe as an edible herb. It has spread throughout southern Ontario and out-competes native wildflowers such as the trillium, the provincial flower.

• Round gobies, a fish species, are aggressive feeders and steal eggs from nesting smallmouth bass.

• The emerald ash borer is a highly invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees in southern Ontario. It poses a major economic and environmental threat to urban and forested areas.

• When combined with sun exposure, the sap from the giant hogweed can cause skin to burn and inflame. In some cases, affected areas can remain sensitive to UV light years after exposure.

To learn more, read the Ontario Invasive Species Strategic Plan.
Canadian residents can fish licence-free in Ontario from July 7 to 15, providing families a fun and affordable way to enjoy the province’s beautiful lakes and rivers.

Family fishing events in towns and provincial parks across Ontario include:

• Eight Urban Fishing Festivals in the Greater Toronto Area

1. Unionville — Toogood Pond

Saturday, July 7, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: Just north of Highway 7 and west of Main Street in Unionville, at the pavilion of Carleton Road.
Partners: Ontario Chinese Anglers Association, Town of Markham, Hawgtown Bassmasters, MNR Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels are available for kids under 16 to take home on a first-come, first-served basis.

2. Pickering — Progress Park at Frenchman's Bay
Saturday, July 7, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: From Highway 401, take Brock Road south. Turn right onto Bayly Street; take Liverpool Road south to Commerce Street; turn right (west) to Front Street, turn left (south) to Progress Park entrance.
Partners: Pickering Rod and Gun Club, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters - Zone G, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, City of Pickering, Muskies Canada, MNR Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels can be borrowed on a first-come, first-served basis. There will be free hotdogs and refreshments for kids. Bait is supplied at no cost.

3. Pefferlaw — Pefferlaw River
Saturday, July 7, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: The event takes place on the Pefferlaw River at the mouth of Lake Simcoe. Follow Highway 48 north to Holmes Point Rd. (just before the river and lights on Hwy 48); turn left (north) and follow signs to Peninsula Resort, 202 Holmes Point Rd.
Partners: Peninsula Resort, Pefferlaw Anglers, Town of Georgina, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, Pefferlaw Post, York Environmental Stewardship, Kid’s Fishing Day (Toronto Sportsmen’s Show), Sobeys Sutton, No Frills Sutton, Lioness Club of Pefferlaw, Frog Street Firewood, Home Hardware Sutton, Bonnie Boats, Captain Morbids, D. W. & Sons Bait and Tackle and Ministry of Natural Resources, Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels can be borrowed on a first-come, first-served basis. All rods, equipment, bait and refreshments will be offered at no charge on a first-come, first-served basis after pre-registered participants have been accommodated. To avoid disappointment, free pre-registering at lake-simcoe.ca is recommended.

4. High Park, Grenadier Pond
Saturday, July 7, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: Located at 1873 Bloor Street West. Take the TTC to High Park Station and walk south from the station to enter the park. Take West Road or Colborne Lodge Drive to Grenadier Restaurant and walk down the hill to the pond.
Partners: City of Toronto, Evergreen Foundation, MNR Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels will be supplied for kids under 16 to take home on first-come, first-served basis. Bait will be supplied at no cost.

5. Darlington Provincial Park
Saturday, July 7, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Directions: Hwy 401 to Courtice Rd. Go south to Darlington Park Rd. to the gates. Staff will instruct on how to get to Picnic Area #4.
Partners: OFAH Zone E, Darlington Provincial Park and MNR Aurora District. Provincial Park Gate day-use fees of $14 per vehicle are in effect.
A limited number of rods and reels can be borrowed on a first-come, first-served basis. Free hotdogs and refreshments will be available for kids. Bait will be supplied at no cost.

6. Toronto Islands
Sunday, July 8, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: Take the ferry to Centre Island and then proceed to the Boathouse.
Partners: City of Toronto, Toronto Region Conservation Authority, Ontario Chinese Anglers Association, Canadian National Sportsman Shows, Ontario Power Generation, Kids, Cops & Canadian Tire, MNR Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels will be supplied for kids under 16 to take home on a first-come, first-served basis. Bait will be supplied at no cost.

7. Newmarket — Fairy Lake
Sunday, July 8, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: Fairy Lake is located in Wesley Brooks Park, off Eagle Street just east of Main Street.
Partners: Newmarket Optimists, Aurora Bassmasters, Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority, Kids, Cops & Canadian Tire, York Regional Police Association and MNR Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels can be borrowed on a first-come, first-served basis. Free hotdogs and refreshments will be available for kids. Bait will be supplied at no cost.

8. Meadowvale — Lake Aquitaine Park
Saturday, July 14, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Directions: From Highway 401, take Winston Churchill Boulevard down to Derry Road, over to Aquitaine Avenue and then right on Glen Erin Drive. Turn left at first lights into Meadowvale Community Centre. Event is behind community centre.
Partners: Credit Valley Conservation Authority, Izaak Walton Fly Fishing Club, Mississauga Bassmasters, the City of Mississauga, MNR Aurora District.
A limited number of rods and reels will be supplied for kids under 16 to take home on first-come, first-served basis. Bait will be supplied at no cost.

• Rock Bass Family Fishing Day on Whitefish Lake at Algonquin Provincial Park, July 7

• Dorion Township Huck Finn Derby at the Dorion Township Recreation Centre, July 8

• Powassan Family Fishing Derby at South Himsworth Public Beach, July 9

• Hamilton Bass Master’s 1st Annual Kids Fishing Derby in Christie’s Conservation Area, Dundas, July 14

• The 16th Annual Dorset Kids Fish Derby, July 15

“Ontario has beautiful lakes, streams and rivers. Whether you’ve never fished before or have been doing it for years, fishing is a wonderful way to spend some time together as a family, enjoying this province’s great outdoors,” says Michael Gravelle, Ontario minister of natural resources.

QUICK FACTS

• Canadians may fish licence-free in provincial waters during Family Fishing Week. Non-residents require licences.

• Approximately 1.3 million anglers fish in Ontario each year and spend $2.5 billion in the province annually.

• Ontario is home to 160 species of freshwater fish in lakes and rivers across the province.

• Family Fishing Week is supported by the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, Canadian Sportfishing Industry Association and Canadian National Sportfishing Foundation, as well as many local sponsors and dedicated volunteers.

• If you fish without a licence during Family Fishing Week, you must follow the conservation licence limits set out in the 2012 Recreational Fishing Regulations Summary.

To learn more about fishing in Ontario:

• Plan your fishing trip from start to finish with Ontario’s Fish ON-Line tool at ontario.ca/fishing.

• For more information on fishing events, visit the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

• Find out more about Ontario’s Family Fishing Week.

Take a look at our exciting new July-August issue, about the war on the shores of Lake Simcoe, a new approach to landscaping, and bringing your living room outdoors!

http://issuu.com/bluetilelounge.ca/docs/lakesimcoelivingjulyaugust12

This year's bass fishing season opens June 28 throughout much of southern Ontario, and thousands of bass anglers are anxious to begin fishing for their favourite species once again.

Bass are typically the last species to open … and for many, it has been a long wait since their season closed — Nov. 30, 2011, in Lake Simcoe and throughout the rest of Fisheries Management Zone 16.

This year many anglers will be eager to try a relatively new rig while pursuing bass in Ontario. There was some debate among these anglers as to how legal this rig was, so we have developed the attached fact sheet to help set the record straight for recreational anglers. 
The Umbrella Rig Quick Facts:

• The Umbrella rig, also known as the Alabama rig, was used to win a large bass fishing tournament in Alabama in October 2011.  This is now one of the most sought-after pieces of tackle in the bass-fishing community both here in Ontario and throughout the United States.

• The rig consists of a hard body with a line-tie followed by five wire strands in a fan design, each with a snap swivel at the end.  Anglers can attach a variety of lures to each swivel for a look that is meant to imitate a school of baitfish.

• In Ontario, it is illegal to fish with a line that has more than four hooks attached.  The original Alabama rig with five hooks or lures attached is not permitted for use in the province, but one modified to four strands or arms to accommodate only four hooks is allowed. (See photo.)

Information is also available on the the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources site: www.mnr.gov.on.ca

Umbrella_Rig_on_rocks

 

 

Get Your Free Subscription! Delivered Straight to
Your Inbox.

Enter your email to receive updates from us. You can unsubscribe at any time.